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Category: FVPSA

NCADV Applauds House Passage of the Family Violence Prevention and Services Improvement Act of 2021

The National Coalition Against Domestic Violence applauds the House of Representatives for passing H.R.2119, the Family Violence Prevention and Services Improvement Act of 2021. H.R.2119, introduced by Representatives McBath, Young, Moore, and Katko, is a bipartisan, bicameral bill that reauthorizes the Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (FVPSA), which has been unauthorized since 2015. H.R.2119 increases the funding authorization, to ensure more programs are able to receive FVPSA fun... Read More
Posted by Lynn Brewer-Muse at Wednesday, October 27, 2021

ACTION ALERT: Contact Your Representative and Tell Them to Vote YES on Reauthorize and Strengthen FVPSA

The Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (FVPSA) is one of the three pillars of the Federal response to domestic violence. It provides core funding for more than 1,500 domestic violence programs nationwide and supports more than 240 tribes and tribal organizations as well funding state domestic violence coalitions and funding a network of training and technical assistance resource centers. It also funds the National Domestic Violence Hotline and the StrongHearts Native Helpline. FVPSA ... Read More
Posted by Lynn Brewer-Muse at Friday, September 24, 2021

Action Alert: Tell Congress to Pass a COVID Package That Meets Needs of DV Survivors

Congress MUST pass a COVID-19 relief package that includes not only economic support for unemployed, underemployed, and low-income families but also funding and policies specifically addressing the unique needs of survivors. In previous COVID-19 relief packages, Congress provided no relief funding for survivors of sexual assault, for community-based culturally-specific organizations serving survivors in Communities of Color who are disproportionately impacted by COVID-19, or for tribal victi... Read More
Posted by Lynn Brewer-Muse at Thursday, January 28, 2021

NCADV Disappointed VOCA Fix to Prevent Funding Cuts NOT Included in Funding Bill

The National Coalition Against Domestic Violence (NCADV) is extremely disappointed that, despite bipartisan, bicameral support and constituent pressure, Members of Congress chose not to include a provision to prevent dramatic cuts to non-taxpayer funded Victims of Crime Act (VOCA) grants in the Fiscal Year 2021 (FY’21) funding bill. If it had passed, this provision would have addressed historically low deposits into VOCA’s Crime Victims Fund (CVF) by redirecting monetary settlemen... Read More
Posted by Lynn Brewer-Muse at Tuesday, December 29, 2020

Action Alert: Sign on to Letter to Congress for Your Organization

As supplemental Family Violence Prevention and Services Act grants from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act are becoming available to domestic violence programs, it is important to recognize the domestic and sexual violence fields’ successes - both in battling COVID-19 on the frontlines and also in urging Congress to fund critical victim service programs. The House’s Health and Economic Recovery Omnibus Emergency Solutions (HEROES) Act contained importan... Read More
Posted by Lynn Brewer-Muse at Tuesday, May 26, 2020

NCADV Applauds Senators for Introducing the Family Violence Prevention and Services Improvement Act of 2019

The National Coalition Against Domestic Violence (NCADV) applauds Senators Robert Casey (D-PA) and Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) for introducing S.2259, the Family Violence Prevention and Services Improvement Act of 2019. The Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (FVPSA) is one of the three pillars of the federal government’s response to domestic violence. It provides critical core funding to domestic violence shelters and programs; it keeps the lights on and the doors open. FVPSA also fu... Read More
Posted by Lynn Brewer-Muse at Friday, July 26, 2019

What Domestic Violence Programs and Shelters Need to Know About the Government Shutdown

Congress and the White House are at an impasse in their negotiations about funding the federal government, and a speedy resolution is not expected. RELATED: Yes, VAWA Expired: What This Means, How We Got Here, and What Happens Next Although parts of the government are currently shut down due to the gap in appropriations, the Office on Violence Against Women remains open this week. We recommend you reach out to your program manager as soon as possible to ascertain what you should do at ... Read More
Posted by Lynn Brewer-Muse at Thursday, January 3, 2019

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